Anticancer Herbs

Anti Cancer Herbs & Spices

dreamstime_greenleavetea7675908HERBS AND SPICES COMMONLY USED IN THE KITCHEN, HAVE ANTI-INFLAMMATORY EFFECTS THAT HELP PREVENT THE GROWTH AND SPREAD OF CANCER IN A NUMBER OF WAYS

Many herbs and spices have been long recognized to help prevent cancer. Not only do these herbs taste great, but they also have been shown in the lab to have anti-cancer properties plus many herbal remedies have a long history demonstrating their anti cancer effects. They are full of antioxidants.

 

 

 

Important:

herbs1Many serious medical conditions are not appropriate for self-diagnosis or self-medication and require the supervision of qualified health care providers. Use caution when practicing self-care. Speak to your Doctor if you are thinking of adding herbs to your diet to treat or prevent cancer; if you are on any medication. Herbs have a powerful impact , and can interfere with prescription medications or your chemotherapy.

Herbs & Spices: (Coming Soon)

A good website I recommend is:

http://www.masantenaturelle.com/chroniques/herbier/accueil_herbier.php

http://www.thekitchn.com/quick-guide-to-every-herb-and-spice-in-the-cupboard-108770 Buckthorn bark

Alfalfa
Anis
Artemisia
Ashwagandha
Astagalus
Basilic
Bee propolis
Black pepper
Bloodroot
Boswellia
Burdock root
Capsicum
Cayenne Pepper
Chervil
Chili peppers and jalapenos
Cinnamon
Cleavers
Coriander
Cumin
Dandelion leaves
Echinacea
fennel
Ganoderma  Garlic
Ginger
Ginkgo Biloba
Ginseng
Grape Seed
Goldenseal
Gotu kola
Hornet Nest  Ledebouriella
Marijuana
Marjoram
Mint
Mistletoe
Mustard
Myrrh
Parsley
Quercetin
Red clover
Rei Shi mushroom
Resveratrol
Rhubarb
Rosemary
Rubescentis
Oldenlandia
Oregano
Periwinkle
Poke root
Queen’s delight
Saffron
Scutellaria
Solanum
Thyme
Thuja
Turmeric
Vanilla
Wild violet
Yellow dock

Herbal Teatea

green tea
white tea

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Herbs & Spices:herbs2

 

 

Alder Buckthorn bark

Alfalfa

Anis

Artemisia

Ashwagandha

Astagalus

basilic

Bee propolis

black pepper

bloodroot

boswellia

Burdock root

capsicum

Cayenne Pepper

chervil

Chili peppers and jalapenos

Cinnamon

Cleavers

coriander

cumin

Dandelion leaves

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Echinacea

Common Names:
Echinacea, purple coneflower, coneflower, American coneflower
Description
There are nine species of herb echinacea, but only three are used medicinally, Echinacea angustifolia, Echinacea pallida & Echinacea purpurea. It is part of the daisy family. all are native to the United States and southern Canada. It is originally a North American Indian remedy. This native American herb has an impressive record of laboratory and clinical research. Thousands of doctors currently use echinacea for treating infectious diseases. It was prominent in modern American medicine in the early 20th Century. Today millions of Europeans use echinacea as their primary therapy for colds, flus, infections, and for general immune-boosting effects.
Use For:
Echinacea is use in problem areas stemming from an under-functioning immune system; It stimulates various aspects of the immune system (such as the macrophages and natural killer cells). It is helpful in stimulating the production of interferon – which is a virus fighting substance.
It is a benefit to the lymphatic system.
It is helpful in energizing certain white blood cells and having anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties.
echinacea stimulates the overall activity of the cells responsible for fighting all kinds of infection
It is used in the treatment of colds, flu, colic, and other infectious illnesses,
It is useful in anti-inflammatory conditions such as tonsillitis and chest infections
Reduce sensitivity to allergies.
Echinacea has been used for wounds and skin problems, such as acne or boils, skin regeneration and skin infections, Psoriasis, eczema and inflammatory skin conditions, lessens symptoms of and speeds recovery from viruses (external use)
reduces inflammation in arthritis and inflammatory skin conditions; reducing swelling and inflammation, and soothing areas of soreness.
alleviate the pain of bites, cuts, stings and bruises, and so help prevent infection if the skin’s surface is broken.
It is natural “antibiotic” and infection fighter is useful to kill bacteria, viruses, fungi as well as other microbes that can cause infection and disease.

It is an immunostimulant and inhibits hyaluronidase activity and stimulates the activity of the adrenal cortex. The inhibitory activity of lipoxygenase accounts for its anti-inflammatory activity.
useful in middle ear infection, urinary tract infection, sore throat, herpes infections and candida, bronchitis and sinus infections.
Contains:
It contains a selection of compounds such as: arabinose, betaine, copper, echinacen, echinacin B, echinacoside, echinolone, enzymes, fructose, galactose, glucose, glucuronic acid, glycosides, humulence, inulin, inuloid, iron, pentadecadiene, phenolics, polyacetylene compounds, poly-saccharides, potassium, rhamnose, sucrose, sulfur, tannins, xylose as well as vitamin A, C & E.
Oncology/Medicinal
using echinacea while suffering from HIV infection is however not clear, and people with HIV should first discuss supplementation of echinacea with their health care professional before taking it.
increases the number and activity of immune system cells, including anti-tumor cells:
promotes T-cell activation;
Contra-indications
If you are allergic to any herb of the daisy family you may have an allergic reaction to echinacea and the oral intake of echinacea may also worsen the symptoms of people suffering from lupus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis.
Potential side effects
Echinacea has an excellent safety record and is very well tolerated by most people. There is no known toxicity. Echinacea should not be used in progressive systemic and auto-immune disorders such as tuberculosis, leicosis, connective tissue disorders, collagenosis and related diseases such as lupus, according to the German Kommission E. Its use in AIDS or opportunistic infections in AIDS patients is controversial.

  • When taken by mouth, echinacea does not cause side effects. However, some people experience allergic reactions, including rashes, increased asthma, and anaphylaxis (a life-threatening allergic reaction). In clinical trials, gastrointestinal side effects were most common.
  • People are more likely to experience allergic reactions to echinacea if they are allergic to related plants in the daisy family, which includes ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, and daisies. Also, people with asthma or atopy (a genetic tendency toward allergic reactions) may be more likely to have an allergic reaction when taking echinacea.
  • Tell all your health care providers about any complementary and alternative practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care. For tips about talking with your health care providers about CAM, see NCCAM’s Time to Talk campaign.

How to use it
The aboveground parts of the plant and roots of echinacea are used fresh or dried to make teas, squeezed (expressed) juice, extracts, or preparations for external use.
Echinacea root is the part, which has been used
Today nearly all parts of the plant are used, including the root, leaves, flowers, and seeds. Echinacea is available commercially in a number of forms – dried root or herb, liquid extract, powder, capsules and tablets, and creams and gels.

  • Liquid extracts (or tinctures): very popular forms for ease of use. May be alcohol- or glycerine-based. Extract strength varies, so following manufacturers’ directions is important. Recommended amounts range from one to five droppersful per use (0.5-5 ml.) three times per day.
  • Capsules or tablets: may contain root powder or herb. Recommended usage level: 1/2 – 2 g per use three times a day.
  • Echinacea tea:. The usage level for root and/or herb brewed as a tea: 1/2 – 2 g per use three times a day

How Much Study
Study results are mixed on whether echinacea can prevent or effectively treat upper respiratory tract infections such as the common cold. However, other studies have shown that echinacea may be beneficial in treating upper respiratory infections.
NCCAM is continuing to support the study of echinacea for the treatment of upper respiratory infections. NCCAM is also studying echinacea for its potential effects on the immune system.
an extract of echinacea showed an increase of 50%-120% in immune function over a 5 day period (Jurcic, et al. 1989).
an extract of echinacea significantly increased the resistance to flu and reduced the symptoms of lymph gland swelling, inflamed nasal passages and headache (Braunig, et al. 1992).
Of 4500 patients with inflammatory skin conditions, including psoriasis, 85% were cured with topical applications of echinacea salve (Wacker & Hilbig, 1978).
Human white blood cells, stimulated by echinacea extract increased phagocytosis (consumption) of yeast cells by 20-40% compared to controls. (Wagner and Proksch 1985)

Culinary use

should be used sparingly in herbal recipes, rather than as a main ingredient. The roots are the most powerful part of the plant, though other parts are beneficial to include in your cooking. Be careful how you use the flowers – these have very little scent when dry, but when wet with rain they smell odd. If you want to use the Echinacea flowers as a decorative garnish remember to dry them beforehand.
Echinacea tastes slightly bitter, so make it more palatable by adding natural sweeteners such as honey. Herbs that go well with Echinacea are those with a strong flavor: fennel, laurel bay, nettle and rosemary all help to increase the positive effects on the immune system that Echinacea stimulates.
With its powerful effect as an immune booster, Echinacea is often used alone as a tincture or tea. This recipe combines it with rosemary, lemon and honey, which all help to strengthen your system.

  • Measure a cup of water into a pan and boil with a sprig of rosemary and half a sliced lemon for five minutes. Strain the liquid into a cup or mug, add 3 drops of Echinacea tincture and a teaspoon of honey; garnish with a slice of lemon.
  • You can also make this medicinal tea by pouring boiling water into a mug containing an Echinacea teabag and a sprig of fresh rosemary. Steep for five minutes and squeeze in a few drops of lemon juice, the remove the Echinacea and rosemary and add a teaspoon of honey and a slice of lemon.

Make an attractive salad for a summer party and, at the same time, benefit from the health-giving effects of Echinacea.

Echinacea flowers can be dried and used in teas and salads to increase your energy and keep your immune system healthy. The flowers are attractive fresh of dried, but are best dried for medicinal and culinary use.

  • Roughly tear up some crisp lettuce leaves and line a salad bowl with them.
  • Place layers of thinly sliced tomatoes, cucumber and radishes over the lettuce in the shape of a flower.
  • Add small cubes of feta cheese and thick slices of hard-boiled egg in the centerer then sprinkle the Echinacea flowers sparingly over the top. The herb vinegar recipe opposite works well as a dressing for this healthy salad.

Echinacea flowers are high in cichoric acid, which slows the reproduction of viruses, so this herb vinegar is especially useful when you are unwell and can also act as a preventative against illness.

  • Half-fill an attractive bottle with good quality vinegar. Add a few springs of Echinacea flowers and a sprig of rosemary and thyme.
  • Chop a clove of garlic into thick chunks, sprinkle into the bottle and top up with more vinegar; store the bottle in a cool, dark place.

Important note

Great sums of money are currently being spent by large multi-national pharmaceutical corporations on further research, by prestigious universities, on the benefits of this humble little plant, and we can expect that echinacea will be used far wider in allopathic medicine in the near future.
With long-term use, echinacea appears to lose effectiveness. Maximum periods of continuous use: 6 – 8 weeks. Echinacea is not a substitute for other medical interventions in rapidly accelerating infections. If the condition persists or worsens, seek medical advice

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fennel

Ganoderma

Garlic

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Ginger

Common Names
botanical name is Zingiber officinale and in Chinese medicine is referred to as Sheng Jiang. The English name ginger comes from French: gingembre, Old English: gingifere, Medieval Latin: ginginer, Greek: zingiberis. It is sometimes called root ginger to distinguish it from other things that share the name ginger.
Description
Both Chinese and Ayurvedic medicine have been using ginger for centuries, Ginger cultivation began in South Asia and has since spread to East Africa and the Caribbean, India, and the West Indies. Ginger is a tropical plant that has green-purple flowers and an aromatic underground stem (called a rhizome). In Chinese medicine it is classified as a warming herb, Other notable members of this plant family (Zingiberaceae) are turmeric, cardamom, and galangal.
Use For
It is commonly used for cooking consumed as a delicacy, medicine, orspice.
Treating illnesses
Ginger is used in Asian medicine to treat stomach aches, nausea, and diarrhea.
May also have blood thinning and cholesterol lowering properties that may make it useful for treating heart disease
Cleansing of the colon, cramps, stimulating circulation, bowel disorders, fever, hot flashes, muscle aches, reducing allergies, indigestion, morning sickness, motion sickness, nausea and vomiting, and because of its anti-microbial properties is also used for sores and wounds.
used to balance the doshas (which is the three organizing principles providing for homeostasis in Ayurvedic medicine), sort out symptoms of colds and other viral infections, enhancing digestion, stimulating appetite and lessening arthritis
West Indies ginger is used for the treatment of urinary tract infections while Nigerian herbal practitioners use ginger for the treatment of malaria and yellow fever. Ginger compounds are active against a form of diarrhea which is the leading cause of infant death in developing countries.
In more western remedies it is used for nausea, headaches, colds, flu, fever, motion sickness and as an anti-inflammatory.
helped to lessen the pain and inflammation. women suffering from rheumatoid arthritis
can be helpful with easing bronchial constriction during allergies and colds.
the anti-inflammatory effects of ginger are achieved by inhibiting arachidonic acid metabolism in both the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways.
Ginger has been used for rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and joint and muscle pain.

research also indicates that nine compounds found in ginger may bind to human serotonin receptors, possibly helping to affect anxiety
Contains
100g of Ginger contains the following nutritional information according to the USDA:

  • Calories :
  • Fat: 0.75
  • Carbohydrates: 17.77
  • Fibers: 2
  • Protein: 1.82
  • Cholesterol: 0

Oncology/Medicinal

Ginger is used to alleviate postsurgery nausea as well as nausea caused by motion, chemotherapy, and pregnancy.
Contra-indications
Ginger can cause stomach distress if taken in large quantities, and also acts as a menstrual stimulant and potential abortifacient, although small quantities are considered safe for pregnant women. Ginger should not be taken orally if you suffer from stomach or duodenal ulcers.
Ginger is “generally recognized as safe” list, though it does interact with some medications, including warfarin. Ginger is contraindicated in people suffering from gallstones as it promotes the production of bile
Potential side effects

  • Few side effects are linked to ginger when it is taken in small doses.
  • Side effects most often reported are gas, bloating, heartburn, and nausea. These effects are most often associated with powdered ginger.
  • Tell all your health care providers about any complementary and alternative practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care. For tips about talking with your health care providers about CAM, see NCCAM’s Time to Talk campaign.

An acute overdose of ginger is usually in excess of about 2 grams of ginger per kilogram of body mass, dependent on level of ginger tolerance, and can result in a state of central nervous system over-stimulation called ginger intoxication or colloquially the “ginger gitters”.
Allergic reactions to ginger generally result in a rash, and although generally recognized as safe, ginger can cause heartburn, bloating, gas, belching and nausea, particularly if taken in powdered form. Unchewed fresh ginger may result in intestinal blockage, and individuals who have had ulcers, inflammatory bowel disease or blocked intestines may react badly to large quantities of fresh ginger. Ginger can also adversely affect individuals with gallstones. There are also suggestions that ginger may affect blood pressure, clotting, and heart rhythms.

How to use it
The rhizomes and roots of the plant and used and it is used in herbal remedies. The underground stems of the ginger plant are used in cooking, baking, and for health purposes.
How Much
Study

  • Studies suggest that the short-term use of ginger can safely relieve pregnancy-related nausea and vomiting
  • Studies are mixed on whether ginger is effective for nausea caused by motion, chemotherapy, or surgery.
  • It is unclear whether ginger is effective in treating rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, or joint and muscle pain.
  • NCCAM-funded investigators have looked at whether ginger interacts with drugs, such as those used to suppress the immune system, and ginger’s effects on reducing nausea and vomiting. Investigators are also studying:

The general safety and effectiveness of ginger’s use for health  purposes, as well as its active components and effects on inflammation.

The effects of ginger dietary supplements on joint inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, and osteoporosis.

Culinary use

Fresh ginger can be substituted for ground ginger at a ratio of 6 to 1. Powdered dry ginger root is typically used as a flavoring for recipes such as gingerbread, cookies, crackers and cakes, ginger ale, and ginger beer.
Ginger produces a hot, fragrant kitchen spice. often used as a spice in Indian recipes and is a quintessential ingredient of Chinese, Japanese and many South Asian cuisines for flavoring dishes such as seafood or goat meat and vegetarian cuisine.
Young ginger rhizomes are juicy and fleshy with a very mild taste. They are often pickled in vinegar or sherry as a snack or just cooked as an ingredient in many dishes.
They can also be steeped in boiling water to make ginger tea, to which honey is often added; sliced orange or lemon fruit may also be added. Ginger can also be made into candy. Candied ginger is the root cooked in sugar until soft, and is a type of confectionery.
Ginger acts as a useful food preservative.
Fresh ginger may be peeled before eating. For longer-term storage, the ginger can be placed in a plastic bag and refrigerated or frozen.
Important note
Common forms of ginger include fresh or dried root, tablets, capsules, liquid extracts (tinctures), and teas.

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Ginkgo biloba

Common Names:
the specific epithet biloba derived from the Latin bis ‘two’ and loba ‘lobed’, referring to the shape of the leaves. Two names for the species Pterophyllus salisburiensis and the earlier Salisburia adiantifolia. The older Chinese name for this plant is 銀果 (‘silver fruit’), nowadays pronounced as yínguǒ in Mandarin. The most usual names today are 白果 bái guǒ (‘white fruit’) and 銀杏 yínxìng (‘silver apricot’). The former name was borrowed directly in Vietnamese (as bạch quả). The latter name was borrowed in Japanese (as ぎんなん “ginnan”) and Korean (as 은행 “eunhaeng”), when the tree itself was introduced from China. also ginkgo, Ginkgo biloba, fossil tree, maidenhair tree, Japanese silver apricot, baiguo, bai guo ye, kew tree, yinhsing (yin-hsing)
Description
Ginkgo biloba is a unique species of tree. Ginkgoes are large trees, normally reaching a height of 20–35 m (66–115 feet), with some specimens in China being over 50 m (164 feet). A combination of resistance to disease, insect-resistant wood and the ability to form aerial roots and sprouts makes ginkgos long-lived, with some specimens claimed to be more than 2,500 years old. It is a unique species of tree with no close living relatives. The ginkgo tree is one of the oldest types of trees in the world. It has various uses as a food and traditional Chinese medicine. It is being used in Europe to alleviate cognitive symptoms associated with a number of neurological conditions. Ginkgo biloba is a powerful antioxidant and is well known for its powerful action to enhance circulation, even to the smallest of body parts, and apart from helping with the blood flow, it is thought to also make the blood less sticky. It is also sometimes referred to as GBE (Ginkgo Biloba Extract) it has been used for centuries by the Chinese, and has become a conventional supplement in Europe.
Ginkgo biloba is a plant extract containing several compounds that may have positive effects on cells within the brain and the body. Ginkgo biloba is thought to have both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, to protect cell membranes and to regulate neurotransmitter function.
it is also referred to as the “smart herb”
Use For:
Ginkgo biloba improves brain functioning by increasing the cerebral and peripheral blood flow, the circulation and oxygenation.

used to treat depression headaches, memory loss, boosting short-term memory, vertigo, tinnitus, leg cramps, asthma, eczema, heart and kidney disorders, impotence, penile dysfunction and male infertility.
Ginkgo leaf extract has been used to treat a variety of ailments and conditions, including asthma, bronchitis, fatigue, and tinnitus (ringing or roaring sounds in the ears).
used to improve cognitive health in aging
ginkgo leaf extracts use to improve memory; to treat or help prevent Alzheimer’s disease and other types of dementia;
decrease intermittent claudication (leg pain caused by narrowing arteries);
to treat sexual dysfunction,
multiple sclerosis,
Ginkgo is also a neroprotective agent which is believed to be where it’s actions come from for its benefits as well as its Antioxidant and detoxifying properties.
Contains:
The leaves of this herb contain ginkgolides and heterosides, but need to be taken for some time for the full effect to be felt.
Oncology/Medicinal
Extracts of Ginkgo leaves contain flavonoid glycosides and terpenoids (ginkgolides, bilobalides) and have been used pharmaceutically. There are various conditions where Ginkgo has been used to help, showing beneficial effects in all, these are;

Arterial circulatory problems - This condition can cause blood clots and stop or restrict the blood flow to important parts of the body and organs like the heart. Ginkgo can help to stop blood clots forming and help to keep a healthy circulation system.

Cerebral atherosclerosis – This condition is when there is hardening and blockages of the arteries. Ginkgo can help to relieve these symptoms by softening the arteries and helping to unblock the blood vessels.

Cerebral edema - This condition is where the body tissue contains a high amount of fluid. This condition can affect the vessels, and Ginkgo can help to relieve this fluid tension in the blood vessels.

Cochlear deafness – This condition causes progressive deafness within younger adults, and is usually inherited. When this condition affects the blood vessels Ginkgo has been known, and suggested to help the blood vessels return to normal reliving some symptoms like tinnitus.

Diminished sight - Sometimes when sight is affected by blood vessels Ginkgo can help to relieve some blindness that is suffered. Not many studies have been done on this particular condition on whether Ginkgo is effective. Ginkgo’s qualities to help blood vessels return to normal could help with particular sight problems.

Impairment to memory/ability to concentrate – Ginkgo has been noted in some clinical trials to aid memory. There has been extensive research on this factor, but many people try taking Ginkgo to try and help aid their memory. It helps to increase the blood flow to the brain which is usually the common cause for brain and memory conditions.

Arterial obstruction - Ginkgo helps to restore the natural blood flow in blocked arteries. It is used widely used to help treat conditions where this appears, and studies have shown positive effects that Ginkgo has had as a treatment.

Reynard’s disease - This condition is when the hands and feet are exposed to the cold and can not warm back up again. This is because the blood vessels are not flowing properly to these extremities. Ginkgo can help to restore the proper blood flow which helps the hands and feet to recover from the cold, helping relieve the symptoms of Reynard’s such as pins and needles and numbness.

Alzheimer’s disease - This disease takes away the ability for the person to do every day things. People can lose their memory through this disease, and is a degenerative disease. Ginkgo has been used to help the symptoms of this condition, helping to aid alertness and memory.

Vertigo - Ginkgo has also had positive effects on helping people who suffer from vertigo, by relieving the dizziness, and nausea.
Many doctors and physicians have been prescribing Ginkgo for Alzheimer’s patients and people suffering from dementia, as it has shown good results in some people. Most doctors are open to alternative treatments and should be consulted before taking Ginkgo Biloba.
Contra-indications
People on blood thinning medication should consult their doctor before taking Ginkgo as it can help to thin the blood, which could cause serious problems. Also people who are waiting for surgery or any dental operations should not take Ginkgo Biloba due to the same reasons that it helps to thin the blood, causing excessive bleeding.

Ginkgo, can although a natural product, cause some reactions with certain drugs. You should always consult your doctor before taking this product as it is not completely known what drugs Ginkgo will and won’t react with.
if you are on any medication, to assure that it is safe to take with that drug or drugs.

Potential side effects
may experience gastrointestinal upsets with large dosages of ginkgo biloba.
undesirable effects, especially for individuals with blood circulation disorders and those taking anticoagulants such as ibuprofen, aspirin, orwarfarin,
may include headache, nausea, gastrointestinal upset, diarrhea, dizziness, or allergic skin reactions. More severe allergic reactions have occasionally been reported.
can increase bleeding risk, so people who take anticoagulant drugs, have bleeding disorders, or have scheduled surgery or dental procedures should use caution and talk to a health care provider if using ginkgo.
Fresh (raw) ginkgo seeds contain large amounts of a chemical called ginkgotoxin, which can cause serious adverse reactions—even seizures and death.
Roasted seeds can be dangerous.
Products made from standardized ginkgo leaf extracts contain little ginkgotoxin and appear to be safe when used orally and appropriately.
Ginkgo should also not be used by people who are taking certain types of antidepressants (monoamine oxidase inhibitors) and by pregnant women, without first consulting a doctor.
Tell all your health care providers about any complementary and alternative practices you use. Give them a full picture of what you do to manage your health. This will help ensure coordinated and safe care.
How to use it
The leaves of this herb have been used for thousands of years and Extracts are usually taken from the ginkgo leaf and are used to make tablets, capsules, or teas. Occasionally, ginkgo extracts are used in skin products. the leaves and seeds were and are still used as an extract to provide the supplement Ginkgo Biloba. Ginkgo supplements are usually taken in the range of 40–200 mg per day.
How Much
The correct dosage of Ginkgo Biloba is different for different people, and depends on what you are taking the product for. There is no particular strength that is recommended for this product, as lower strengths can work brilliantly for some people and have no effect on others, but you should be careful when taking high doses, and always consult your doctor about what strength to take. Most people can take Ginkgo Biloba with no problems, but if you experience any side effects you should stop taking the supplement straight away, and consult your doctor.
Many supplement companies will have different strengths of purity of the herb in their tablets. A 500mg strength tablet could contain only 50mg of pure herb extract; this is quite a low dose. While a 6000mg tablet could contain 120mg of pure herb extract, which is a high strength of Ginkgo. To make sure you know the real strength of the Ginkgo you should ask your supplement company or your doctor.
Study
In a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, 240 milligrams per day of the dietary supplement Ginkgo biloba was found to be ineffective in reducing the development of dementia and Alzheimer’s disease in older people. Researchers led by Steven T. DeKosky, M.D., conducted the trial known as the Ginkgo Evaluation of Memory (GEM) study at four clinical sites over the course of 8 years. GEM is the largest clinical trial ever to evaluate ginkgo’s effect on the occurrence of dementia.
The most widely researched are dementia, memory impairment, intermittent claudication, and tinnitus.

research includes studies of ginkgo for symptoms of multiple sclerosis, intermittent claudication, cognitive decline, sexual dysfunction due to antidepressants, insulin resistance, and short-term memory loss associated with electroconvulsive therapy for depression.

Culinary use

In Chinese culture, they are believed to have health benefits; some also consider them to have aphrodisiac qualities.
The nut-like gametophytes inside the seeds are particularly esteemed in Asia, and are a traditional Chinese food. Ginkgo nuts are used in congee, and are often served at special occasions such as weddings and the Chinese New Year (as part of the vegetarian dish called Buddha’s delight). Japanese cooks add Ginkgo seeds (called ginnan) to dishes such as chawanmushi, and cooked seeds are often eaten along with other dishes.
When eaten in large quantities or over a long period, especially by children the gametophyte (meat) of the seed can cause poisoning by MPN (4′-O-methylpyridoxine). MPN is heat stable and not destroyed by cooking. Studies have demonstrated that convulsions caused by MPN can be prevented or terminated with pyridoxine.
Some people are sensitive to the chemicals in the sarcotesta, the outer fleshy coating. These people should handle the seeds with care when preparing the seeds for consumption, wearing disposable gloves. The symptoms are allergic contact dermatitis or blisters similar to that caused by contact with poison ivy. However, seeds with the fleshy coating removed are mostly safe to handle.
Important note
Ginkgo is the most widely used phytomedicine that is being sold in Europe, and is one of the top 10 best selling alternative medicines in America.

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Ginseng

Common Names:
Asian ginseng, ginseng, Chinese ginseng, Korean ginseng, Asiatic ginseng are also known as Panax ginseng, Ren Shen or Chinese ginseng while female ginseng is also known as dong quai or angelica sinensis, American ginseng as panax quiquefolium and Siberian ginseng as Eleutherococcus senticosus.
American Ginseng, Anchi Ginseng, Baie Rouge, Canadian Ginseng, Ginseng, Ginseng à Cinq Folioles, Ginseng Américain, Ginseng Americano, Ginseng d’Amérique, Ginseng D’Amérique du Nord, Ginseng Canadien, Ginseng de l’Ontario, Ginseng du Wisconsin, Ginseng Occidental, Ginseng Root, North American Ginseng, Occidental Ginseng, Ontario Ginseng, Panax Quinquefolium, Panax quinquefolius, Racine de Ginseng, Red Berry, Ren Shen, Sang, Shang, Shi Yang Seng, Wisconsin Ginseng, Xi Yang Shen.
Description
Ginseng is any one of eleven species of slow-growing perennial plants with fleshy roots, belonging to the genus Panax of the family Araliaceae.Many types of ginseng are used in supplements. The active ingredient which contains the “magical” properties is ginsenosides or eleuthrosides in the case of the Siberian type and the root is the part of the plant used to obtain the active ingredient. It has been used for the past 7,000 years in traditional Asian medicine. but in essence they are all nearly the same. Ginseng is found only in the Northern Hemisphere, in North America and in eastern Asia (mostly Korea, northern China Manchuria), and eastern Siberia), typically in cooler climates. Panax vietnamensis, discovered in Vietnam, is the southernmost ginseng known. According to traditional Chinese medicine Ginseng promotes yin energy, cleans excess yangand calms the body. American ginseng is an herb. The root is used to make medicine. Don’t confuse American ginseng with Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) or Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng). They have different medicinal effects. Wild American ginseng is becoming rare because it is so popular and has so many uses. Some states have declared American ginseng a threatened or endangered species because so many people try to harvest it. Asian ginseng is native to China and Korea and has been used in various systems of medicine for many centuries. Asian ginseng is one of several types of true ginseng (another is American ginseng, Panax quinquefolius). An herb called Siberian ginseng or eleuthero (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is not a true ginseng.
fresh ginseng is the raw product.
white ginseng (WG) is fresh ginseng which has been dried. It is grown for four to six years, and then peeled and dried to reduce the water content to 12% or less. White ginseng is air dried in the sun and may contain less of the therapeutic constituents.
red ginseng (RG) is harvested after six years, is not peeled and is steam-cured at standard boiling temperatures of 100 °C (212 °F), thereby giving it a glossy reddish-brown color. The roots are then dried. RG is more common as herbal medicine than WG, and there is increasing research on the pharmacological activities of RG specific ginsenoside.
sun ginseng (SG) is created from a heat processing method which increases ginsenoside components such as ginsenoside-[Rg.sub.3], -[Rk.sub.1] and -[Rg.sub.5] by steaming white ginseng at a higher temperature than red ginseng. The herb is steamed for three hours at 120 °C (248 °F).
Use For:
Don’t confuse American ginseng with Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) or Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng). They have different medicinal effects. It is prescribed for a variety of problems ranging from stress, failing memory, obesity, flagging vitality, exhaustion, improving the immune system, fatigue, improving fertility and virility as well as a general strengthening tonic for the body.

Used to enhance athletic performance, assisting in rejuvenating the body, increasing longevity, detoxifying the body, improving skin and muscle tone and perking up your metabolism.
Although western society really got to know ginseng as a sexual stimulant in the beginning, it is a valuable ingredient for enhancing general well-being and health.
Both American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius) and Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) roots are taken orally as adaptogens, aphrodisiacs, nourishing stimulants,[citation needed] and in the treatment of type II diabetes, as well as for sexual dysfunction in men.
both Asian and American forms of ginseng enhance libido and copulatory performance.
American ginseng is used for stress, to boost the immune system, and as a general tonic and stimulant.

American ginseng is often used to fight infections such as colds and flu. There is some evidence that it might help prevent colds and flu and make symptoms milder when infections do occur.

American ginseng is used for other infections including HIV/AIDS, infections of the intestine (dysentery), and particular infections (Pseudomonas infections) that are common in people with cystic fibrosis.

Some people use American ginseng to improve digestion and for loss of appetite, as well as for vomiting, inflammation of the colon (colitis), and inflammation of the lining of the stomach (gastritis).

American ginseng is also used for low iron in the blood (anemia), diabetes, trouble sleeping (insomnia), nerve pain, erectile dysfunction (ED), fever, hangover symptoms, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), blood and bleeding disorders, cancer, painful joints, dizziness, headaches, convulsions, fibromyalgia, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), memory loss, and as an anti-aging aid.

You may also see American ginseng listed as an ingredient in some soft drinks. Oils and extracts made from American ginseng are used in soaps and cosmetics.

Lowering blood sugar after a meal in people with type 2 diabetes. Preventing respiratory tract infections such as the common cold or influenza in adults. Attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Stress. Athletic performance. Breast cancer Anemia. Insomnia. Gastritis. Impotence. Fever. HIV/AIDS. Fibromyalgia
Asian ginseng are numerous and include the use of the herb to support overall health and boost the immune system. Traditional and modern uses of ginseng include:

  • Improving the health of people recovering from illness
  • Increasing a sense of well-being and stamina, and improving both mental and physical performance
  • Treating erectile dysfunction, hepatitis C, and symptoms related to menopause
  • Lowering blood glucose and controlling blood pressure

Contains:
American ginseng contains chemicals called ginsenosides that seem to affect insulin levels in the body and lower blood sugar. Other chemicals, called polysaccharides, might affect the immune system.
The root of Asian ginseng contains active chemical components called ginsenosides (or panaxosides) that are thought to be responsible for the herb’s medicinal properties. The root is dried and used to make tablets or capsules, extracts, and teas, as well as creams or other preparations for external use.
Oncology/Medicinal
can be used in preventing certain cancers, and because of improved blood circulation, it is also used by people in assisting with Alzheimer’s disease
red ginseng reduced the relapse of gastric cancer versus control.
both white ginseng and red ginseng appear to reduce the incidence of cancer, the effects appear to be greater with red ginseng
Falcarinol, a seventeen-carbon diyne fatty alcohol was isolated from carrot and red ginseng, and was thought to have potent anticancer properties on primary mammary epithelial (breast cancer) cells. Other acetylenic fatty alcohols in ginseng panaxacol, panaxydol and panaxytriol) have antibiotic properties.

Hormone-sensitive conditions such as breast cancer, uterine cancer, ovarian cancer, endometriosis, or uterine fibroids: American ginseng preparations that contain chemicals called ginsenosides might act like estrogen. If you have any condition that might be made worse by exposure to estrogen, don’t use American ginseng that contains ginsenosides. However, some American ginseng extracts have had the ginsenosides removed (Cold-fX, Afexa Life Sciences, Canada). American ginseng extracts such as these that contain no ginsenosides or contain only a low concentration of ginsenosides do not appear to act like estrogen.
Contra-indications
Potential side effects
May cause temporary breast tenderness and menstrual irregularities,
people with high blood pressure and hypoglycemia should be careful of using high dosages of this ingredient.
nausea, diarrhea, headaches, nose bleeds, high blood pressure, low blood pressure, and breast pain.
May also lead to induction of mania in depressed patients who mix it with antidepressants.
May include bleeding, dry mouth and lips, excitation, fidgeting, irritability, tremor, palpitations, blurred vision, headache, insomnia, increased body temperature, increased blood pressure, edema, decreased appetite, increased sexual desire, dizziness, itching, eczema, early morning diarrhea, bleeding, and fatigue.
May include nausea, vomiting, irritability, restlessness, urinary and bowel incontinence, gastrointestinal problems. fever, increased blood pressure, increased respiration, decreased sensitivity and reaction to light, decreased heart rate, cyanotic facial complexion, red face, seizures, convulsions, and delirium
Inability to sleep (insomnia),
Schizophrenia (a mental disorder)
lower levels of blood sugar; this effect may be seen more in people with diabetes.
American ginseng is POSSIBLY UNSAFE in pregnancy.
Asian ginseng can cause allergic reactions.
It is possible to treat an overdose with an herbal decoction of 120 grams of gan cao (Radix glycrrhizae). However, patients experiencing any of the above symptoms are advised to discontinue the herbs and seek any necessary symptomatic treatment
How to use it
Do not take this combination.
Warfarin (Coumadin) is used to slow blood clotting. American ginseng has been reported to decrease the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin). Decreasing the effectiveness of warfarin (Coumadin) might increase the risk of clotting. It is unclear why this interaction might occur. To avoid this interaction, do not take American ginseng if you take warfarin (Coumadin).
Be cautious with this combination.

Medications for depression (MAOIs)
American ginseng might stimulate the body. Some medications used for depression can also stimulate the body. Taking American ginseng along with these medications used for depression might cause side effects such as anxiousness, headache, restlessness, and insomnia.

Some of these medications used for depression include phenelzine (Nardil), tranylcypromine (Parnate), and others.

Medications for diabetes (Antidiabetes drugs)
American ginseng might decrease blood sugar. Diabetes medications are also used to lower blood sugar. Taking American ginseng along with diabetes medications might cause your blood sugar to go too low. Monitor your blood sugar closely. The dose of your diabetes medication might need to be changed.

Some medications used for diabetes include glimepiride (Amaryl), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase PresTab, Micronase), insulin, pioglitazone (Actos), rosiglitazone (Avandia), chlorpropamide (Diabinese), glipizide (Glucotrol), tolbutamide (Orinase), and others.

Asian ginseng may lower levels of blood sugar; this effect may be seen more in people with diabetes. Therefore, people with diabetes should use extra caution with Asian ginseng, especially if they are using medicines to lower blood sugar or taking other herbs, such as bitter melon and fenugreek, that are also thought to lower blood sugar.
How Much
BY MOUTH:

  • For reducing blood sugar after a meal in people with type 2 diabetes: 3 grams up to 2 hours before a meal. American ginseng should be taken within 2 hours of a meal. If it is taken too long before eating, the blood sugar might become too low.
  • For preventing upper respiratory tract infections such as the common cold or flu: a specific American ginseng extract called CVT-E002 (Cold-fX, Afexa Life Sciences, Canada) 200 mg twice daily for 3-4 months has been used.

Other names

Quantities of around 200 mg in extract form is mostly used in a multi-supplement, while pure ginseng supplements normally contain up to 1,000 mg per capsule / dose. American ginseng is POSSIBLY SAFE in adults and children when used short-term.
Study
Russian scientists believe that ginseng, which is an adaptogen (more on adaptogens), stimulate physical and mental activity while also improving the endocrine gland function and having a positive effect on sex glands. It is useful in sparing the use of glycogen (glycogen is a sugar stored in the liver and muscles) as it increases the use of fatty acids (fatty acids discussed further).
Breast cancer. Some studies conducted in China suggest that breast cancer patients treated with any form of ginseng (American or Panax) do better and feel better. But this may not be a result of taking the ginseng, because the patients in the study were also more likely to be treated with the prescription cancer drug tamoxifen. It is difficult to know how much of the benefit to attribute to ginseng.
Some studies have shown that Asian ginseng may lower blood glucose. Other studies indicate possible beneficial effects on immune function.
Although Asian ginseng has been widely studied for a variety of uses, research results to date do not conclusively support health claims associated with the herb. Only a few large, high-quality clinical trials have been conducted. Most evidence is preliminary—i.e., based on laboratory research or small clinical trials.
NCCAM supports studies to better understand the use of Asian ginseng. Areas of recent NCCAM-funded research include the herb’s potential role in treating insulin resistance, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Culinary use

The root is most often available in dried form, either whole or sliced. Ginseng leaf, although not as This ingredient may also be found in some energy drinks, often the “tea” varieties;highly prized, is sometimes also used; as with the root, it is most often available in dried form.

Important note
The root is normally 3 – 4 years old when used, but the best roots are those grown for 60 – 80 years, but are so expensive that they are not used in commercial applications.

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Grape Seed

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Goldenseal

Common Names
Goldenseal (Orange-root, Orangeroot; Hydrastis canadensis)
Description
The Cherokee people as well as other Native Americans have been using goldenseal for a host of medicinal uses, it’s a perennial herb. in the buttercup family Ranunculaceae, native to southeastern Canada and the northeastern United States. It may be distinguished by its thick, yellow knotted rootstock. The stem is purplish and hairy above ground and yellow below ground where it connects to the yellow rhizome. The plant bears two palmate, hairy leaves with 5–7 double-toothed lobes and single, small, inconspicuous flowers with greenish white stamens in the late spring. It bears a single berry like a large raspberry with 10–30 seeds in the summer.
The roots of the plant are used, and got its name from the cup-like scars on the roots, which form on the previous year’s growth and resemble wax seals that were used to “seal_envelopes” seal envelopes.
Use For
Goldenseal has been ascribed the following herbal properties (whole herb): bitter, hepatic, alterative, anticatarrhal, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial,laxative, emmenagogue, and oxytocic.
Goldenseal is often used as a multi-purpose remedy, and is thought to possess many different medicinal properties. In addition to being used as a topical antimicrobial, it is also taken internally as a digestion aid, and may remove canker sores when gargled.
skin diseases, ulcers, and gonorrhea.

used for colds and other respiratory tract
infections, infectious diarrhea, eye infections, and vaginitis
(inflammation or infection of the vagina). It is occasionally used to treat cancer.

used to soothe inflamed and infected mucus membranes.
assist with our immune system.
help to boost our immune system,
assists in fighting bacteria and viruses.
used as a detoxifier and blood purifier, and is said to be beneficial for the liver.
helps with urinary tract infections, sinus problems
promoting the healing of mouth ulcers and cold sores.
assist with stimulating digestion (since it helps in the stimulation of the gall bladder to secrete bile), counteracting sweet cravings and having antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties.

Contains
Goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) contains berberine and hydrastine alkaloids, which are the active compounds in this herb. It is the berberine that imparts the rich and bright golden yellow color to the herb.
The other compounds found in goldenseal are albumin, b-complex vitamins, biotin, calcium, candine, chlorine, choline, chlorogenic acid, inositol,iron, lignin, manganese,PABA, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin A, C & E.

Oncology/Medicinal

Contra-indications

Potential side effects
High intake of goldenseal can lead to diarrhea, respiratory problems and irritation of the mucus membranes.
Pregnant women, people on anticoagulant medication or people with a heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes or glaucoma should not use it. People suffering from lupus or multiple sclerosis should also avoid goldenseal.

How to use it
Goldenseal is taken orally in tablet or tincture form, and applied locally to sores and ulcers.

How Much

Study

Culinary use

The alkaloids are bitter, and for this reason most herbal infusions (herbal teas) that contain goldenseal, also include other sweet herbs, to lessen the taste. In Chinese medicine it is referred to as a “bitter tonic herb”.

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Gotu kola

Hornet Nest

Ledebouriella

Marijuana

Marjoram

Mint

Mistletoe

Mustard

Myrrh

Parsley

Quercetin

Red clover

Rei Shi mushroom

Resveratrol

rhubarb

Rosemary

Rubescentis

Oldenlandia

Oregano

Periwinkle

Poke root

Queen’s delight

Saffron

Scutellaria

Solanum

thyme

Thuja

Turmeric

Vanilla

Wild violet

Yellow dock

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teaHerbal tea

green tea

white tea

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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